The Scissors Select Tool

Hello and welcome to this video series on the Gimp. On this video, we’re going to be going over another select tool up here in our toolbox. This is going to be our “Scissors Select Tool” and it’s a little bit different than these other select tools in that it gives you a little more flexibility to the area that you are selecting. But aside from that is you can see it has its similarities too. We can feather the edges, antialiasing, and the different modes where you can add or subtract on the selected areas. But this one does so by connecting the dots so to speak.

scissors select tool

So let’s go and get started here by cutting out and manipulating the area around our little spilled ice cream if you will. So there’s our first dot and the second. As you can see, it kind of puts lines that connect those dots. That’s not exactly staying on the line. Now I want to point out to just above my scissors next to my pointer, there’s a plus sign. When you get back to the original dot you can see it turns into an infinity symbol. So whenever we get here, we’re going to click on that, it basically completes our selection. Now you can manipulate this by grabbing one of these dots and pulling out, and adding dots, and again you are manipulating this selection area here. Now once you’ve completed your selection area, you hit your enter key and that completes your selection. So all the little marching ants here inside of that is your selected area. Now, let’s demonstrate that a little different way than we have using these other selection tools.

scissors select tool

Let’s go up here to the edit button in our toolbar and down here we can either clear the selected area, we can fill the entire area with a foreground (that’s the FG color). And here we have our foreground color and the background color. And you can change this simply by clicking on this, and you can change this to purple, green, blue, or any variation thereof. Or we can go up here if you’re going to be a little more precise and this gives you a little bit more of an idea as the blending options you know what looks cool, what doesn’t look so good. We’ll get into the bucket or the color fill section at a later video but for the time-being, we’ve got these two as our foreground and background colors. Now you go to the black and white by just going over here and clicking on this and you go back to the original black and white. So I’m going to change this again. We’ve got green here and the background we’re going to go with a little pinkish color.

scissors select tool

So now, we’ll go back up here to the edit and we’ll want to fill with the foreground color just click on that. If you want to fill with the background color and go with that. Now under the bucket fill tool, we see the different options we have here. Under the pattern fill, you’ve got several choices you can work with. Right now, we’ve got the warning pattern. You know the black stripes on the yellow background. You just simply click on this icon and here are several patterns you can choose from. Now in another video we’re going to be getting into later on I’ll show you how you can add to your pattern selection here.

scissors select tool

Like for example, this one is pine. We’re going to do the same thing here. Just click on this and now we have our pine fill. Or you can do the same thing up here by fill with pattern. Whatever pattern you have here, you can fill it with that. Now, the stroke is basically an outline of the selected area. Let’s go to show you this. And you can determine solid colors, that’s basically we’re going to use here and just click on stroke. Whatever the foreground color is, it’s the stroke. And you can change that too.

scissors select tool

Let’s go and switch this around, edit, stroke, solid stroke and you see we changed it to the foreground color currently. So that is a quick introduction to the scissors tool and a brief overview of the fill section of the color selection tool. We already get in to the bucket fill tool in a later point but again I just want to demonstrate some of the things you can do with your toolbar up here at the top under the edit selected area. So hopefully you learned something out of this video and we’ll get into more applications of these tools in later videos but for the time-being again I’m just introducing you to the various functions of each of these tools. Thank you very much for watching and have a great day!

***To Download the PDF of this tutorial Click Here.

The User Interface

Hello and welcome to this video series on the Gimp! And on this segment of the videos, we are going to be touching base a little bit on the user interface, or the main window, or the toolbox. So let’s go ahead and jump up into this and open up our software. On mine, I have the GIMP Tip of the Day pop-up and if you didn’t want this on yours then all you have to do is untick this box here and it won’t show up anymore. One thing I want to point out is this box-looking thing here that contains all the tools, it’s called the Toolbox.

user interface

And we’re on the main window. One thing I want to point out is that whenever you first install the GIMP on your PC, a lot of times this bottom box down here or dock is empty. And what I do and what most folks do is they put their tool options down here so instead of having to double-click on each one of these tools and pop and open a box up here which they call the dialogs for each tool that you want to check in to. Then you just dock them right here below and it saves desktop space and a little more user-friendly too.

Now for some reason, the version of Camtasia that I’m working with now and this version of GIMP I don’t want to see eye to  eye. So I cannot really show you how to do this because it just doesn’t work. But if you were to do this on your pc, then you would see what I’m talking about. Actually, there’s a lot of different ways to do this.

user interface

What you have to do is go to file, then go to dialogs, and up here to Tool Options  and it will open up a  box up to the side here. This box or dialog would say tool options up here. What you do is as you see how my mouse changed from pointer to a hand, you left-click on your mouse, hold it down, and then drag this over to this dock in this empty box here. Now you would have this as I do now.

user interface

So that’s just one way you can get this in here and it just saves your desktop space without having to have this dialogs all over the place. Now, one thing I want to point out is you can have that dialogue here. You can have this one dialog or dock with several different dialogs up here on the top. By the way, this is another way where you can add to your particular dock and station here. You got a little arrow here, go to add tab, and it shows all the different dialog possibilities here. So see if I can add layers to this. There we go. So it does work. So we’ve got the channels, dialog, we’ve got the layers dialog, and you can just keep on adding if you’d like. I like undo history because this way if I make mistake, which I’m prone to do from time to time, then you just click on this tab and it takes you back a step. So if you make several mistakes, then you just go back until it goes to the part of your project that there’s no longer a mistake and then you just start from scratch at that point on.

user interface

And another thing too is that this little space right in here below these boxes and above this line, if you’re to take one of these tabs here like I cannot do this. I’ll just drag this tab down here then this little section down here would light up and you would have another box. It’s just a matter of keeping your desktop somewhat uncluttered so you can work within. Like for example, this is how I do it. I would have just my project, my header, or my eBook cover in amongst in between these two dialogs or docks and do my work here. Whatever palette is up here that I’m currently working on is what this would we referring to. For example, let me go and open up one here. As you can see, this one is working on this guy right here. And if I do another one, it is now working with this one.

user interface

So whatever is in the forefront or whatever palettes I’m working on at that time, this is going to show up here. So I’ll click on this and you can see it’s this guy here become this. And you see this guy here. So you can have multiple projects going on at the same time. Like for example this is your header, this is your eBook cover, or your footer. It’s definitely possible to do that. But I’m kind of getting off topic. I’ll cover a little bit more of the functionality of the program in a later video. Well, for the time being I just want to point out some of the functions of the dialog, the palette, and the docks. Thanks a lot for watching this video and have a great day!

***To Download the PDF of this tutorial Click Here.

Tool Spotlights: Vectors and Paths


For those of you who have ever experimented with Adobe Illustrator, the idea of paths will be familiar to you. To explain paths, first we need to discuss how Gimpshop stores image data. For the most part, Gimpshop is a raster-based program, meaning that it stores its data in the form of pixels; small, discreet points of a specific color. However, it does support vector-based data storage, in the form of paths. Vectors store their information as mathematical data, and are resolution independent. They’re perfect for things like logos and graphics that need to be blown up as large as possible. This video will walk you through the basics of creating vectors and smooth curves with the path tool in Gimpshop.
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Tool Spotlights: Painting Part 1


The paint tools in Gimpshop are extremely powerful, not just for painting brand new images, but also for manipulating photos, blending two photos together, and many other tasks. This video will walk you through some of the paint tools that Gimpshop has to offer. This set of tools is pretty extensive, so keep an eye out for part two soon.
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Gimpshop 101: The Basics of Layers


Layers are the one thing that sets pro-caliber photo editing software apart, because they allow what is called “non-destructive editing”—you can edit your photos without losing the original information that you started with. This video, the last in our four part series, will get you acquainted with layers and how to use them.
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Gimpshop 101: Photo Manipulation Tools


Welcome back to part two of four in our Gimpshop 101 series. Today’s video builds on part one, and shows you how to use the most common photo manipulation tools available to you in Gimpshop. Make sure you follow along with your own copy of the software! Our studies show that students are far more successful with the program when they follow along actively instead of just watching the video and nodding along.
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